Developing a Safety Plan
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1. Every individual in an abusive relationship needs a safety plan.
In developing your safety plan, you should individualize it, taking into account:
  • Age
  • Marital status
  • Whether children are involved
  • Geographic location
  • And resources available

2. Think about all possible escape routes:
  • Doors
  • First-floor windows
  • Basement exists
  • Elevators
  • Stairwells
  • Rehearse if possible
[EXIT]

3. Choose a place to go:
  • To the home of a friend or relative who will offer unconditional support
  • Or a motel, hotel, or shelter
  • Most importantly, somewhere you will feel safe
[Home]

4. Pack a survival kit:
  • Money for emergencies
  • A change of clothes
  • Extra house and car keys
  • Birth certificates
  • Passports and greencards
  • Medications and copies of prescriptions
  • Insurance information
  • Checkbook and credit cards
  • Legal documents such as separation agreements and protective orders
  • Address books and valuable jewelry
  • Papers that show jointly owned assets
  • Police records
  • Pay stubs, income tax records

  • Conceal it in the home, or leave it with a trusted neighbor, relative or friend
  • Important Papers can also be left in a bank deposit box
[Keys and Prescriptions]

5. Start an Individual Savings account
  • Have statements sent to a trusted relative or friend.
[MONEY]

5. Avoid arguments in certain areas
  • Avoid arguments with the abuser in areas with potential weapons.
  • Kitchen, garage, or in small spaces without an outside door.

6. Contact the Domestic Violence Hotline

  • Know the telephone number of the domestic violence hotline 1-800-33-HAVEN
  • Contact it for information on resources and legal rights helters provide safe shelter, emotional support, advocay, referrals to other social services and information on victim's rights.
[Phone]

7. Review the Safety Plan monthly

  • Review the safety plan
[Reminder]
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